Here In Wyoming,
We Live And Let Live.
But We Also Look Out For Each other.

One of the best ways we can do that is by taking charge of our own sexual health.

More than a way to protect ourselves, it's also a way to protect our partners.

IF YOU...

Have more than one sexual partner

Have anal or vaginal sex without a condom

Have sex with someone who's HIV+

Have (or have recently had) an STI

Have used injection drugs recently

...THEN YOU NEED TO KNOW WHY PrEP MATTERS.

WHY PrEP MATTERS

Through 2017, 461 people have been diagnosed with HIV in Wyoming. The most-affected groups included men who have sex with men, those using injection drugs, and those engaging in heterosexual sex.

As someone’s sexual partner, the choices you make have real power: Power to positively or negatively affect not only your current partner, but also your future partners, their future partners, and so on.

PrEP matters because you deserve to feel safe, protected, and prepared as you explore your sexuality, and taking control of your sexual health is the first step. It’s how we look after and protect ourselves, and it’s how we look after and protect each other.

For more information on accessing PrEP in Wyoming, explore our Resources section below.

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THE BASICS

WHAT IS PrEP? add_circle_outline

PrEP, an abbreviation for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, is a daily prescription pill for HIV-negative people who are at risk of getting HIV through sex or injection drug use.

WHAT DOES PrEP DO? add_circle_outline

When taken daily, PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk of getting HIV by more than 70%. When PrEP is combined with regular, correct condom use, the risks go down even more.

Why daily, consistent use? That’s the only way to ensure the presence of PrEP medicine in your bloodstream, allowing it to successfully block the HIV virus if it enters your system, then prevent it from spreading throughout your body.

HOW LONG DO I NEED TO TAKE PrEP? add_circle_outline

The total length of time you take PrEP is entirely up to you and your healthcare provider. Most people take it daily during periods of time when they feel they are at risk for getting HIV, then stop taking it once they adopt different sexual behaviors or lifestyles.

WHO IS PrEP MEANT FOR? add_circle_outline

PrEP is meant to be taken by people without HIV (HIV negative) who are at high risk of getting HIV through sex or injection drug use.

If you can answer “yes” to any of the questions below, PrEP may be a good HIV prevention option for you.

  • Do you use condoms sometimes or not at all?
  • Are you open to consistently taking a daily pill?
  • Are you in an open relationship or having anal and/or vaginal sex with multiple partners?
  • Are you having sex with someone whose HIV status you don’t know?
  • Have you injected drugs, shared needles, or been in drug treatment in the past six months?
WHEN DOES PrEP BECOME EFFECTIVE? add_circle_outline

For receptive anal sex, PrEP reaches maximum protection after about seven days of daily use; for receptive vaginal sex and injection drug use, it takes about 20 days. In both cases, the pill needs to be taken every day to retain its effectiveness and provide maximum protection.

RISKS/SIDE EFFECTS OF PrEP? add_circle_outline

The most common side effects reported are headache, abdominal pain, and weight loss. More serious side effects can include the worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection; kidney problems, including kidney failure; severe liver problems; and bone problems, including pain, softening, or thinning. This is why your healthcare provider will perform STD tests, and blood and urine tests prior to prescribing PrEP, and why it’s so important to continue having these tests performed routinely during the periods you take PrEP.

PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS

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HOW CAN PrEP PROTECT PEOPLE WHO USE INJECTION DRUGS?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 1 in 10 new HIV diagnoses in the United States are attributed to injection drug use. HIV can survive in a used needle for up to 42 days, which makes the risk of getting HIV very high if an HIV-negative person shares injection equipment with someone who is HIV-positive.

If you or someone you know uses injection drugs, taking PrEP can reduce the risk of getting HIV by more than 70%.

COST CONCERNS

HOW MUCH DOES PrEP COST?

Since PrEP is approved by the FDA, your insurance could cover at least some (if not all) of the cost of PrEP, your doctor’s visits, and your lab tests.

Before you make an appointment, make a call to your insurance provider and find out about co-pays, deductibles, and any required pre-authorization forms you may need before you can fill your prescription.

HOW DO I GET PrEP IF I DON'T HAVE INSURANCE/PRESCRIPTION COVERAGE?

If you’re without health insurance, aren’t eligible for Medicaid, or don’t have prescription coverage, you can request financial support and guidance through Advancing Access, visit the Partnership for Prescription Assistance, or enroll in the Gilead Advancing Access® Co-Pay Program.

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FIND A PROVIDER

HOW DO I GET PrEP?

Because PreP is available only by prescription, you’ll need to make an appointment with your healthcare provider, or find one near you.

At your appointment, you and your provider will determine if PrEP is the right choice for you. If you’re not sure what questions to ask, here are some ideas to get you started:

Questions to ask

Your provider will also perform blood tests and urine tests to check for the presence of HIV and STDs and ensure your kidneys and liver are in good shape.

Once test results come back, and you and your provider have agreed that PrEP is the right choice for you, your provider will be able to write you a prescription.

RESOURCES